Build A Wacky Electronic Noise Maker

Find Your Signature Sound

Noise Maker By Ari Dubinsky

Assembly Time: 6 to 8 hours
Skill Level: Intermediate

Musicians have their own signature sounds; why not make your own? Take a step up from your beginner kits and dive into the deep end of your musical fantasies. The wacky noise maker is sure to make you ears wiggle when you hear what lies in the sleeping belly of this dormant monster. From unmistakable synth sweeps to wild vocal popping, you won't be able to put down this novel instrument.

Parts List:

Qty.
Part Description Mfr. Part No.
1
Proto Board PCB-69-R
1
Switch 1MS9T1B1M1QE
1
0.1µF Capacitor DC.1/25
1
LM741CN IC LM741CN-R
1
CD40106 IC CD40106BE
1
100KΩ Potentiometer RV24AF-10-15R1-A15
4
1MΩ Potentiometer 31VA601-E3
1
2N3904 Transistor 2N3904(FSC)
2
.022µF Capacitor DC.022
1
100µF Capacitor R100/25
1
4.7KΩ Resistor CF1/4W472JRC
4
1MΩ Resistor CF1/4W105JRC
1
100KΩ Resistor CF1/4W104JRC
1
10KΩ Resistor CF1/4W103JRC
2
1KΩ Resistor CF1/4W102JRC
1
Battery Snap G/S(A-102)-R
2
1µF Capacitor SR305E105MAA-VP
1
10MΩ Resistor CF1/4W106JRC
Qty.
Part Description Mfr. Part No.
2
470pF Capacitor DM471
1
Wire 9313-LB-R
1
Input Jack 11
1
9 Volt Battery L6F22/VINNIC
1
8 PIN IC Socket 6000-8DW-R
1
14 PIN Socket 6000-14DW-R
2
Knob JK-904B
3
Knob JK-905C-R
1
Enclosure H-65-9V-BK
1
LED LG3330
4
Nuts 36012
4
Screws 28655
8
Washers #4FW-R
1
Rubber Feet SJ5008BLKC
1
Electrical Tape 054007-69764
1
Soldering Iron SUPERPASE 258VL
1
Solder KESTER #83-4000-0000
 


Noisemaker SchematicNoise Maker Schematic (Click to enlarge)

FYI: This version of the noise maker was built without the addition of a second switch and is not the only way the noise maker can be constructed. Follow the schematic to fit your taste.

Step 1: (Fig. 1) Working with a pad-per-hole perforated board for the first time can be a bit confusing, especially if your organizational skills aren't up to par. So, in order to plan your layout I would begin by soldering a couple of the socket leads (8-pin, 16-pin) to the board, so you can change your plan in case your first layout doesn't seem to work.

Step 2: (Fig. 2) When you feel that your sockets are in a comfortable spot, begin to add the resistors. Do not cut the leads of the resistors yet; instead fold the leads over. We will use them as jumpers later on. Once you have added the resistors, you should have a pretty good feel about how your layout will be, so go ahead and solder the rest of the socket's leads.

Place sockets and resistors on board
Step 3: (Fig. 3) Capacitors are next. Place them strategically and don't neglect the polarity. Don't cut the leads yet.

Step 4: (Fig. 4) Add the transistor and make sure it is oriented correctly.

Add capacitors and transistors
Step 5: (Fig. 5) When you flip the board you should be able to see a big hairy mess. Now you will begin to solder the leads to each other. Use the solder to bridge gaps between short distances and the extended leads of components for further distances. You may clip the leads once you have the parts connected.

Step 6: (Fig. 6) A zoom in can help you see what I mean.

Soldering
Step 7: (Fig. 7) There are instances where not everything can be attached from the bottom. We will use solid core wire on the topside to solve this problem. Continue to make your connections and begin to add your external hardware, e.g., potentiometers, jack, battery snap , LED and switch.

Step 8: (Fig. 8) Insert your ICs and battery, and flip the switch. If your LED lights up, it's usually a good sign. You can test it by running your noise maker through an amplifier via a 1/4" instrument cable.

Add more components
Step 9: (Fig. 9) Use masking tape to cover the surface of your enclosure. With a pen, mark the spots where you will drill holes for the switch, LED, potentiometers and input jack. I chose to place my jack on the side of the enclosure.

Step 10: (Fig. 10) Use the screws and nuts to secure the board from the rear of the enclosure. The washers may act as risers.

making the box
Step 11: (Fig. 11) Fit the hardware through the holes and lock the pieces into place using the washers and nuts they came with. Use hot glue for the LED.

Step 12: (Fig. 12) Attach the knobs (19.8MM, 14.6MM) and rubber feet. It's up to you to decide which ones you would like to use.

Attach the knob and LED

Troubleshooting Issues

LED will not light, sound isn't produced, turning the knobs doesn't affect the pulse-rate, etc.

1. Check the soldering job. Make sure the solder from leads don't touch each other.
2. Replace the battery.
3. Match components with the schematic's specifications.
3. Check for damaged components.
4. Make sure polarized components are oriented correctly on the board (e.g., IC, capacitors and LEDs).

This project is based on a MusicFromOuterSpace.com project.


Ari Dubinsky currently attends Cal Poly San Luis Obispo in pursuit of a degree in Electrical Engineering and has teamed up with Jameco to accelerate his learning, as well as to lend a helping hand to a major electronics distributor. His interests include shredding on the guitar, electronics and music production.